Learning analytics and learning design

This blog is based on reading ‘Informing pedagogical action: aligning learning analytics with learning design’ (Lockyer et al., 2013)

The authors claim that data collected is underused or even unused due to a lack of an underlying framework. They propose a framework called checkpoint and process analytics. They argue that this framework can be applied to provide information on the impact of learning activities.

Checkpoint analytics

The student has accessed the relevant resources of the learning design e.g shown through log-ins and pages visited. Checkpoint analytics measure which files diagrams etc the learner has accessed (these are considered to be pre-requisites to the learning).

The value of checkpoint analytics lies in providing teachers with insight into whether learners are progressing through the planned learning sequence.

Some pedagogical actions

  • reports of student log-ins can be used to offer prompts for late starters
  • teacher can initiate action
  • student participation levels can be reviewed to see whether all are particpating in activities where they are all required to.

Process analytics

The student has processed the learning and applies information and knowledge e.g. shown through the tasks completed, forum postings and discussions. Process analytics measures whether the learner carries out the tasks they are expected to, using the provided learning resources to do this.

The value of process analytics lies in providing teachers with insight into engagement levels of individual learners, which networks they have built and therefore whether they have support structure or not. They also have value in determining the level of understanding.

Some pedagogical actions

  • ideas are shared and discussed – teacher can monitor the level of understanding
  • social network analysis allows identification of the effectiveness of each groups’ interaction process

I feel these categories are more useful than previously explored (data driven and pedagogical driven) This is a practical and pragmatic framework and feels  more user friendly.

References:

Lockyer, L., Heathcote, E. and Dawson, S. (2013) ‘Informing pedagogical action: aligning learning analytics with learning design’, American Behavioral Scientist, vol. 57, no. 10; also available online at http://libezproxy.open.ac.uk/ login?url=http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1177/ 0002764213479367 (accessed 14 July 2016).

MAODE, H817, Open University, Block 4 Activity 11

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